Before any mold is released for production (“blue-tagged”), it is imperative to put the mold through a series of final-check bench procedures to verify “All Systems Go” and minimize any opportunities for the mold to be stopped and returned to the shop for something that should have been caught before it was released. Water leaks, heater problems, etc., can be avoided with a final-check procedure.

One of the simplest proactive steps is getting an annual plumbing inspection. These are often free or free with other services. The plumber will inspect all visible plumbing including fixtures, pipes, appliances, and drains. They diagnose and fix small problems before they become big ones. They can also tell you the best time to replace worn fixtures and appliances.
It’s important to get rid of all moisture ASAP before it causes more damage. And for small leaks, this may not be difficult, but it’s important to be thorough. Use fans to circulate air in the affected area. For larger projects, consider renting a large-capacity dehumidifier to really dry out surrounding wood, carpet, and other materials. You don’t want any moisture left after your water damage repair.
The water restoration process is an important one. Using the right procedures and materials can help people save cherished belongings and even prevent their homes from being condemned. Water restoration companies specialize in mitigating the effects of water, but the success for water damage restoration depends on the severity of the damage and the amount of water that caused the damage. Water restoration companies may hire outside experts to assess a property and determine a water restoration and water removal plan. These water restoration companies typically use high-tech equipment and well-documented procedures to control water damage. Water in basement areas may only require a short cleanup process, but water in other areas of a property will require extensive remediation.
Important: Abrasive stones break down during mold and die polishing, grinding, tool sharpening, and dressing of cutting & grinding wheels. The resulting dust is classified by OSHA as inert or nuisance dust. Please consult the Material Safety Data Sheet for each stone; data provided therein pertains primarily to the dust produced during and after use. Please note that hazards may change when abrasive stones are used in conjunction with solvents, cutting fluids or other chemicals. For more complete information, consult the Material Safety Data Sheets of chemical products used with abrasive stone products.
Black water contains pathogenic agents and is grossly unsanitary. Anyone with a compromised immune system, respiratory problems, or allergies, as well as young children and the elderly must remain off the job site until the building is judged safe for occupancy. Black water includes sewage and other contaminated water sources entering or affecting the indoor environment, such as: toilet backflows, flooding from seawater, ground surface water, and rising river water. Category 3 water can contain contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals, or toxic substances.
To further ensure a safe and effective environmental remediation, our crews are rigorously trained in mold removal procedures approved by the Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA); Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC);  the Restoration Industry Association (RIA); and our own in-house trainers. In addition, all of our superintendents, operations managers, project managers, project directors and regional managers  hold Certified Mold Remediation (CMR) certifications.
Black water contains pathogenic agents and is grossly unsanitary. Anyone with a compromised immune system, respiratory problems, or allergies, as well as young children and the elderly must remain off the job site until the building is judged safe for occupancy. Black water includes sewage and other contaminated water sources entering or affecting the indoor environment, such as: toilet backflows, flooding from seawater, ground surface water, and rising river water. Category 3 water can contain contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals, or toxic substances.
Water damage can originate by different sources such as a broken dishwasher hose, a washing machine overflow, a dishwasher leakage, broken/leaking pipes, flood waters and clogged toilets. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, 13.7% of all water used in the home today can be attributed to plumbing leaks.[3] On average that is approximately 10,000 gallons of water per year wasted by leaks for each US home. A tiny, 1/8-inch crack in a pipe can release up to 250 gallons of water a day.[4] According to Claims Magazine in August 2000, broken water pipes ranked second to hurricanes in terms of both the number of homes damaged and the amount of claims (on average $50,000 per insurance claim[citation needed]) costs in the US.[5] Experts suggest that homeowners inspect and replace worn pipe fittings and hose connections to all household appliances that use water at least once a year. This includes washing machines, dishwashers, kitchen sinks and bathroom lavatories, refrigerator icemakers, water softeners and humidifiers. A few US companies offer whole-house leak protection systems utilizing flow-based technologies. A number of insurance companies offer policy holders reduced rates for installing a whole-house leak protection system.
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