Porous materials include carpet, insulation, fabric, and similar items. If they’ve been soaked in water, you may have to cut them out and throw them away. Water will permanently damage most porous materials by shrinking or warping them, and mildew will damage them even further. And if you have a beloved piece of furniture you want to save, you could try isolating and drying it out, but the damage may already be done, especially if you see drywall water damage. Note that unsealed cement, drywall, and wood are also porous materials.

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At 1-800 WATER DAMAGE, our mission is simple – provide the ultimate customer experience. Each one of our team members is passionate about what they do and it shows in the quality of our work. Our services go beyond water damage restoration to include mold remediation, professional carpet cleaning, fire/smoke restoration, sewage cleanup, and much more.

Cut through the paper facing of the drywall sheet with a razor knife. Cut along the drawn lines. Break the drywall along the face cut, and fold the drywall slightly to make a crease in the paper backing of the drywall sheet. Cut through the crease in the backing paper with a razor knife from the backside of the drywall sheet, and remove the unwanted portion of drywall. To make cuts that are perpendicular to each other, use a keyhole saw for the shorter of the two cuts, and then fold and cut the drywall.
Water damage occurs when excess water begins to pool in areas where it shouldn’t. Many different factors can create this excess water and thereby contribute to water damage. When you are aware of the potential causes, you can take precautionary measures to help insure against a leak or flood. You will also be able to spot a problem as soon as it arises and nip it in the bud before it has a chance to cause any additional damage. The more quickly you notice the problem, the less work the water extraction and >water damage restoration company will have to fix.
Water damage is often caused by plumbing issues. That’s why it’s important to inspect the plumbing systems in your home at least once a year to ensure that there aren’t any problems with hoses or pipe joints. You should also keep in mind that plumbing pipes have a long lifespan. Brass pipes can last for as many as 70 years while copper pipes can last for more than 50 years. The average lifespan for galvanized steel pipes is often between 20 and 50 years.

Once our restoration team removes the moisture from your home or business, we then will begin repairing and restoring the property. The length of this process depends on the extent of damage. Our team of trained technicians uses all the latest technology and top industrial equipment to remove the moisture and prevent further damage. The sooner that we are contacted, the less damage can affect your property. We offer emergency services and can arrive at your home or business almost immediately. Call Mr. Restore in Dallas today for a free evaluation of the services we provide.


A leaky faucet, cracked bathtub, or failing toilet can easily become a much larger and costlier problem. A 120-square foot bathroom can cost as much as $3,000 to clean up and repair. Homeowners spend an average of about $300 when hiring a plumber, but can save thousands in future expenses. More importantly, homeowner's insurance typically does not cover damage due to ignored maintenance issues.
A leaky faucet, cracked bathtub, or failing toilet can easily become a much larger and costlier problem. A 120-square foot bathroom can cost as much as $3,000 to clean up and repair. Homeowners spend an average of about $300 when hiring a plumber, but can save thousands in future expenses. More importantly, homeowner's insurance typically does not cover damage due to ignored maintenance issues.
If you’ve recently experienced a flood or pipe burst and have water damage in your home, you’re probably wondering “what happens now?” The first, and most important, step when dealing with water or flood damage is to stop any active leaks in the home. This can be done by shutting off the home’s main water supply. If you don’t know how to shut off your home’s water supply, call a professional plumber or your local water supply company for assistance. Once any active leaks have been addressed and all water has been turned off, it’s imperative you call a professional to start the water damage cleanup process as quickly as possible to minimize damage.
Gone were helpful clues for the repair technicians who had yet to begin troubleshooting and analyzing mold performance and wear. So now, how will the repair techs determine if the 63-day production run was too long? Or whether the leader pins, bushings, and interlocks were greased properly during the run? And how will they know if all the swishing during cleaning did not create any “dings” in the sleeves that could be blamed on something else instead of poor cleaning practices? Other questions will remain unanswered, too: Does the mold still have excess vent residue in the top right quadrant? Were all the ejector sleeves numbered and in the proper mold position before they were removed?
After a mold has been cleaned, repaired, changed over, and final-checked, it needs to be given a new status and moved to one of three areas—typically racked in holding/storage area, reset in the press, or staged as a back-up mold in a molding-cell operation. It could also go to an outside vender for rebuild or production. You should know where your molds are.

After you learn how to remove mold, you’ll want to prevent it in the future. The key to stopping most mold is to control dampness. The worst infestations usually occur in damp crawlspaces, in attics and walls where water has leaked in from the outside, and in basements with poor foundation drainage. Stopping leaks, ensuring good ventilation in attics, keeping crawlspaces dry and routing water away from the foundation are the best defenses on how to get rid of mold.
The insurance company will pay to repair your home with materials of like kind and quality to the original. For example, if the carpet was damaged, the insurance company will pay to replace the damaged carpet with carpet of a similar grade and quality. If you choose to upgrade the carpet or change the type of flooring, you will have to pay the extra costs yourself.
You can find out how old your water heater is by looking up the serial number on the manufacturer’s sticker near the top of the water heater. Make sure to regularly inspect your water heater to check for signs of moisture build-up, mold or corrosion. If your water isn’t as hot as it used to be or there’s rust coming from your faucets, it’s time to call a plumber or water heater specialist.
When a severe thunderstorm hits, the risk for property damage increases greatly as heavy rains can cause water damage as well as flooding in your home.  Flooding from storms is a major problem that requires a combination of methods to correctly treat it and protect your health.  Unlike typical water damage from a leaky roof or a burst pipe, flood damage often includes raw sewage that can complicate the remediation process.  As soon as flooding occurs in your home, make sure to call a flood damage cleanup expert to mitigate the damage and safely remove the flood water.
Once you get the OK from your insurer to remove the water, use a sump pump, available from most hardware or home supply stores for $150 to $500, and a wet vac ($40 to $130). Ramirez cautions that water is heavy—a cubic foot weight 10 lbs.—so be careful not to injure yourself, especially if you’re carrying buckets of water up and down stairs. Open doors and windows to allow fresh air to circulate so long as that won’t allow in more water. 
Before you remove any water or make any repairs, fully document the damage for your insurer by taking photos or video. Digital versions are best, says Ramirez, because they can be stored electronically and easily copied. If you start removing water or making repairs before you photograph the damage, you could potentially decrease the extent of your coverage, he says.
Before any mold is released for production (“blue-tagged”), it is imperative to put the mold through a series of final-check bench procedures to verify “All Systems Go” and minimize any opportunities for the mold to be stopped and returned to the shop for something that should have been caught before it was released. Water leaks, heater problems, etc., can be avoided with a final-check procedure.

Mark the damaged drywall with a pencil after you determine the area of drywall you want to remove. Use a straightedge to mark lines vertically and horizontally on the face of the drywall. Whenever possible, have the lines fall over the centers of the framing members behind the drywall; this will provide backing and a fastening surface for the drywall patch.

Surface molds grow in just about any damp location, such as the grout lines of a ceramic tiled shower. They’re easy to scrub away with a mold cleaner mixture of 1/2 cup bleach, 1 qt. water and a little detergent. In mold remediation, the bleach in the cleaning mixture kills the mold, and the detergent helps lift it off the surface so you can rinse it away so it won’t return as fast. You can also buy a mildew cleaner at hardware stores, paint stores and most home centers.

No type of flood damage, no matter the source of the water, is covered by standard homeowners policies. Flooding, for example, can occur from storms, over-saturated ground, overflowing or surging bodies of water such as rivers, ponds, lakes and oceans. You may be able to purchase a separate flood insurance policy through the National Flood Insurance Program.
It’s important to understand the differences because Category 2 and Category 3 water present health risks to your employees and customers and need to be handled differently. The most likely sources of clean water would be water from a pipe, water heater, steam lines or even rainwater. The basic rule of thumb is that it should look and smell like tap water.
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