You can find out how old your water heater is by looking up the serial number on the manufacturer’s sticker near the top of the water heater. Make sure to regularly inspect your water heater to check for signs of moisture build-up, mold or corrosion. If your water isn’t as hot as it used to be or there’s rust coming from your faucets, it’s time to call a plumber or water heater specialist.
Most of us are very familiar with lockout/tagout procedures, test-before-touch practices, and applying safety grounds. While these are key safety aspects of putting equipment into an electrically safe condition, there are other safety items that need to be addressed when working in a natural disaster area. Items such as air quality, structural issues, and chemical spill exposure come into play. It is the responsibility of each company to keep its own people safe and supply them with special personal protective equipment (PPE), such as rubber boots, respirators, dust masks, portable gas monitors, and rubber gloves. As a service company, you must also coordinate with plant safety personnel you've contracted with to develop special safety procedures to address the ever-changing site conditions. Frequent safety meetings are a must to keep everyone up to date with the most current hazard conditions on the site.
Category 3 Water - Known as "black water" and is grossly unsanitary. This water contains unsanitary agents, harmful bacteria and fungi, causing severe discomfort or sickness. Type 3 category are contaminated water sources that affect the indoor environment. This category includes water sources from sewage, seawater, rising water from rivers or streams, ground surface water or standing water. Category 2 Water or Grey Water that is not promptly removed from the structure and or have remained stagnant may be re classified as Category 3 Water. Toilet back flows that originates from beyond the toilet trap is considered black water contamination regardless of visible content or color.[6]
All water damage restoration jobs are unique and the amount of work required for each depends on a variety of factors such as the amount of area in the home that’s been damaged and how long the water has been present. Once a professional water damage cleanup vendor arrives and has a chance to inspect the home, they’ll be able to put together a detailed project timeline specific to your job. In the meantime, we’ve listed the eight common phases that occur during the water damage restoration process and what happens in each, so you’ll know what to expect.
An insurance policy may or may not cover the costs associated with water damage and the process of water damage restoration. While a common cause of residential water damage is often the failure of a sump pump, many homeowner's insurance policies do not cover the associated costs without an addendum which adds to the monthly premium of the policy. Often the verbiage of this addendum is similar to "Sewer and Drain Coverage".
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