Water damage is often caused by plumbing issues. That’s why it’s important to inspect the plumbing systems in your home at least once a year to ensure that there aren’t any problems with hoses or pipe joints. You should also keep in mind that plumbing pipes have a long lifespan. Brass pipes can last for as many as 70 years while copper pipes can last for more than 50 years. The average lifespan for galvanized steel pipes is often between 20 and 50 years.

Damage from long standing water falls in this class, like river flooding or storm surges from a hurricane. It has saturated materials such as stone, brick, and hardwood. These materials have low permeance — meaning they do not soak up liquids quickly. Time is the primary factor in this category. With a higher cost of cleanup and repair, it is important to get problems diagnosed and solved as quickly as possible.
A critical part of any mold maintenance plan is to provide the technicians a historical summary of past issues and corrective actions so they may be aware of longstanding or unresolved issues during repairs. Unfortunately, some technicians skip this first stage until after they get a mold disassembled—and then they stop to research a problem whenever they see or feel something they don’t like.
We offer structural drying, as after the immediate water emergency has been resolved with damage restoration, your house and its contents still need to be thoroughly dried out. We have specialized equipment that is able to get this done in as short a time as possible, and with minimal disruption. Our commercial-grade water extractors will get your carpet and other flooring back to nearly 100% dry condition. We also use high-speed blowers to circulate air at high volumes throughout the house in order to facilitate the drying process.

Mold growth can be controlled on surfaces by cleaning with a non-ammonia detergent or pine oil cleaner and disinfecting with a 10% bleach solution. (Caution: Never mix ammonia and bleach products, as the resulting fumes can be highly toxic.) Always test this solution on a small area of the item or area you’re cleaning to be sure it doesn’t cause staining or fading. 
While there are currently no government regulations in the United States dictating procedures, two certifying bodies, the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) and the RIA, do recommend standards of care. The current IICRC standard is ANSI/IICRC S500-2015.[9] It is the collaborative work of the IICRC, SCRT, IEI, IAQA, and NADCA.
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