You can find out how old your water heater is by looking up the serial number on the manufacturer’s sticker near the top of the water heater. Make sure to regularly inspect your water heater to check for signs of moisture build-up, mold or corrosion. If your water isn’t as hot as it used to be or there’s rust coming from your faucets, it’s time to call a plumber or water heater specialist.
While you have no control over natural water-related disasters, you can take all the preventative measures possible ahead of time to minimize their effect on your home. Flash floods, sudden storms and hurricanes can all trigger water buildup. Prompt attention by contacting The Water Damage Experts as soon as you can after a weather-related issue will help lessen the time for water damage to occur.
The electrical systems in modern cars are particularly prone to flood water damage. Engine control computers, vehicle sensors, infotainment systems, and other electronic devices – along with wiring harnesses and the many connectors that join them together – can be very difficult to salvage. Unless every part is thoroughly cleaned and dried, inside and out, problems caused by corrosion can crop up weeks or even months after the flooding.
Surface molds grow in just about any damp location, such as the grout lines of a ceramic tiled shower. They’re easy to scrub away with a mold cleaner mixture of 1/2 cup bleach, 1 qt. water and a little detergent. In mold remediation, the bleach in the cleaning mixture kills the mold, and the detergent helps lift it off the surface so you can rinse it away so it won’t return as fast. You can also buy a mildew cleaner at hardware stores, paint stores and most home centers.

Porous materials include carpet, insulation, fabric, and similar items. If they’ve been soaked in water, you may have to cut them out and throw them away. Water will permanently damage most porous materials by shrinking or warping them, and mildew will damage them even further. And if you have a beloved piece of furniture you want to save, you could try isolating and drying it out, but the damage may already be done, especially if you see drywall water damage. Note that unsealed cement, drywall, and wood are also porous materials.
In the United States, those individuals who are affected by widescale flooding may have the ability to apply for government and FEMA grants through the Individual Assistance program.[1] On a larger level, businesses, cities, and communities can apply to the FEMA Public Assistance program for funds to assist after a large flood. For example, the city of Fond du Lac Wisconsin received $1.2 million FEMA grant after flooding in June 2008. The program allows the city to purchase the water damaged properties, demolish the structures, and turn the properties into public green space.[2]
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