In addition, it’s important to have a working flashlight and turn off all water and electrical sources within the home, says Dr. Maurice A. Ramirez, author of “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Disaster Preparedness.” Even if the power isn’t operational, it’s a good idea to go to your fuse box and turn off the main, plus all of the individual fuse connections. That way, if the power is reactivated, you’re not at risk for mixing standing water and electricity.

Steven Johnson worked as a toolmaker for 26 years, rebuilding and repairing multicavity molds for Calmar Inc. and then as mold-maintenance engineer for Hospira Inc., a medical device manufacturer. Today, he is the maintenance systems manager for Progressive Components and has his own business, MoldTrax in Ashland, Ohio, which designs and sells software for managing mold maintenance (www.moldtrax.com). He can be reached at [email protected] or (419) 289-0281. 
The average homeowner spends $7.00 per square foot for professional cleanup. That does not include the amounts for repairing and replacing items. Typically, anything that can absorb the contaminants in black water should be replaced, including upholstered furniture, beds, carpets, clothing, and all permeable building materials. Replacement is often more cost effective than restoration.

A dark, damp crawl space allows mold to flourish, which can then cause structural damage. Moisture dripping through the concrete foundation of your home can cause basement leaks. Air leakage into the section between the attic and the home can cause moisture on the underside of the roof, which can lead to mold and rotting. Check your home periodically, and look for light fixtures that are look as well as the overall quality of any noticeable piping.

When a severe thunderstorm hits, the risk for property damage increases greatly as heavy rains can cause water damage as well as flooding in your home.  Flooding from storms is a major problem that requires a combination of methods to correctly treat it and protect your health.  Unlike typical water damage from a leaky roof or a burst pipe, flood damage often includes raw sewage that can complicate the remediation process.  As soon as flooding occurs in your home, make sure to call a flood damage cleanup expert to mitigate the damage and safely remove the flood water.
This category contains contaminants that will cause serious health issues and possibly death. Only professionals should handle most large-scale black water accidents such as flooding. Some cleanup, like a backed-up toilet, can be handled by competent homeowners. This type of cleanup and repair is usually the most expensive, often requiring specialized equipment used by qualified mold and chemical remediation crews. It will often require replacement (not just cleaning) of the affected home materials.
The methods for dealing with damage to walls depend on the type of materials and also what’s behind those materials. Drywall can often be salvaged, when you respond quickly to damage. You can purchase moisture meters that allow you to assess structural integrity. If the integrity checks out then your drying approach will depend on wall contents. If the wall has insulation, you will need to use flood cuts. If there is no insulation, then usually the best method is to create weep holes. And if you’re dealing with a firewall, you’ll want to use staggered cuts.

When the next water damage call comes in for a flood cleanup due to a broken water pipe or drain backup, make sure you have all the commercial restoration equipment on hand that you need to tackle the job in a moment’s notice. Events like floods, hurricanes, wildfires and other natural disasters can leave homes and businesses in peril and in need of professional restoration services.
During the walkthrough, compile a list of flooded equipment to help you estimate man-power requirements and create a preliminary schedule of repair work. As mobilization of crews begins, start developing job strategies, such as finding office space, living accommodations, and transportation for crews. You must also think about arranging food/catering services and developing work schedules. Once your crews have been mobilized and job-site safety requirements are met (see SIDEBAR: Developing a Safety Plan Following a Natural Disaster), it's time to go to work.

It’s important to understand the differences because Category 2 and Category 3 water present health risks to your employees and customers and need to be handled differently. The most likely sources of clean water would be water from a pipe, water heater, steam lines or even rainwater. The basic rule of thumb is that it should look and smell like tap water.

Over a quarter of a million American homes each year will suffer from damage due to frozen or burst pipes. A frozen, broken or leaky pipe are all inconveniences that can lead to major headaches for your home. Ignoring these repairs can be extremely costly as basement water damage can lead to an unstable structure and damage of your valuables. When you need flood damage cleanup with a burst or frozen pipe or are dealing with flooding at all, give us a call today!


If you’ve just experienced a water event, you might be wondering what to do next: Seeping water damage is progressive, pervasive and can mean valuable objects may become permanently damaged – especially if emergency response is delayed beyond the first 48 hours. When moisture seeps into items of value there are immediate steps that can be taken to reduce the amount of long-term damage that results.
The insurance company must start investigating your claim within 15 days after receiving written notice and may ask you for more information. Once you send the information, the insurance company has 15 business days to accept or reject your claim. If the insurance company says it will pay your claim, it must pay within five business days. If the insurance company rejects your claim, it must explain its reasons in writing.
Our water damage technicians first determine the cause of flooding in your home before beginning the process of draining, cleaning, and restoring. The water damage cause plays a vital role in the water damage process. When flooding is caused by natural calamities, there’s a higher chance of bacteria buildup in the affected areas and calls for immediate disinfection. Other water damage causes do not pose health threats and require only the basic process of restoration.
Once help arrives, the first thing a water mitigation contractor will do is inspect the home and evaluate the damage. In order to properly evaluate the damage, they have special tools and instruments they use to measure the moisture content of the home. To do this, they either poke or rest the instruments on top of surfaces like floors, baseboards and ceilings in the damaged rooms to get an accurate reading. Depending on the moisture content readings and Institution of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) dry standards for the state you live in, your contractor will assess if drying equipment is needed.
Your insurance company will only pay for additional living expenses up to your policy's ALE dollar limits. Because repairs on your home can sometimes take months, monitor your expenses carefully to make sure you have enough ALE to cover the entire time you’ll be out of your home. If you reach your policy's ALE dollar limits before your home is fully repaired, you’ll have to pay the rest of the expenses out of your own pocket.
Before any mold is released for production (“blue-tagged”), it is imperative to put the mold through a series of final-check bench procedures to verify “All Systems Go” and minimize any opportunities for the mold to be stopped and returned to the shop for something that should have been caught before it was released. Water leaks, heater problems, etc., can be avoided with a final-check procedure.
It’s important to understand the differences because Category 2 and Category 3 water present health risks to your employees and customers and need to be handled differently. The most likely sources of clean water would be water from a pipe, water heater, steam lines or even rainwater. The basic rule of thumb is that it should look and smell like tap water.
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