Inspect the defects. To find the source of the defects, we perform a visual inspection as high as 24x magnification, use dye-penetrant inspection (DPI), or use fluorescent penetrant inspection (FPI). This allows us to find small pits, microscopic cracks and larger cracks in the gate. If these defects are not identified and repaired, more problems can arise for the gate and the mold.

If you’ve just experienced a water event, you might be wondering what to do next: Seeping water damage is progressive, pervasive and can mean valuable objects may become permanently damaged – especially if emergency response is delayed beyond the first 48 hours. When moisture seeps into items of value there are immediate steps that can be taken to reduce the amount of long-term damage that results.


At 1-800 WATER DAMAGE, our mission is simple – provide the ultimate customer experience. Each one of our team members is passionate about what they do and it shows in the quality of our work. Our services go beyond water damage restoration to include mold remediation, professional carpet cleaning, fire/smoke restoration, sewage cleanup, and much more.

If you’re dealing with anything other than a large incursion, you understandably may be considering handling the cleanup and drying yourself to save money or time. The problem is that cleaning up and recovering from water damage isn’t always as straightforward as it seems. This post highlights 3 key things you need to be aware of when addressing water damage from a minor clean water (or Category 1) incursion.

Mold growth can be controlled on surfaces by cleaning with a non-ammonia detergent or pine oil cleaner and disinfecting with a 10% bleach solution. (Caution: Never mix ammonia and bleach products, as the resulting fumes can be highly toxic.) Always test this solution on a small area of the item or area you’re cleaning to be sure it doesn’t cause staining or fading. 
While there are currently no government regulations in the United States dictating procedures, two certifying bodies, the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) and the RIA, do recommend standards of care. The current IICRC standard is ANSI/IICRC S500-2015.[9] It is the collaborative work of the IICRC, SCRT, IEI, IAQA, and NADCA.
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