Most insurance policies will pay to remove mold only if it must be removed to repair or replace property that was damaged by a covered peril. You must report water damage that was hidden from view within 30 days of the date you first noticed it. Some companies provide a limited amount of mold remediation coverage, and other companies will allow you to buy additional coverage for mold remediation by endorsement.
Believe it or not, there are three types of water. The first type is “clean” water from rain, condensation, leaky pipes, and so on. It’s relatively harmless to clean it up yourself. But if you decide to seek outside help, it costs around $3.75 per square foot for basic water damage cleanup (replacements not included). The second type is gray water, slightly dirty water from dishwashers, washing machines, clean toilets, and so on. And it may have some contaminants. But you can clean it up yourself if you remove it carefully and with proper safety gear to protect yourself. Professional water damage cleanup cost rises to $4.50 per square foot.
The methods for dealing with damage to walls depend on the type of materials and also what’s behind those materials. Drywall can often be salvaged, when you respond quickly to damage. You can purchase moisture meters that allow you to assess structural integrity. If the integrity checks out then your drying approach will depend on wall contents. If the wall has insulation, you will need to use flood cuts. If there is no insulation, then usually the best method is to create weep holes. And if you’re dealing with a firewall, you’ll want to use staggered cuts.
If left untreated, water can be a destructive force to any residential or commercial property. It can lead to mold growth, stains, and can jeopardize the integrity of the building. Our restoration specialists can carefully inspect your property to determine the extent of the damage and can create customized solutions for you. With our 24/7 emergency services, you can rest assured you have a trusted team ready to help you.

The information in this publication is current as of the revision date. Changes in laws and agency administrative rules made after the revision date may affect the content. View current information on our website. TDI distributes this publication for educational purposes only. This publication is not an endorsement by TDI of any service, product, or company.
The water restoration process is an important one. Using the right procedures and materials can help people save cherished belongings and even prevent their homes from being condemned. Water restoration companies specialize in mitigating the effects of water, but the success for water damage restoration depends on the severity of the damage and the amount of water that caused the damage. Water restoration companies may hire outside experts to assess a property and determine a water restoration and water removal plan. These water restoration companies typically use high-tech equipment and well-documented procedures to control water damage. Water in basement areas may only require a short cleanup process, but water in other areas of a property will require extensive remediation.
Position the drywall section in the opening, and use a helper to hold the new drywall in place. Install fasteners through the drywall into the wall or ceiling framing. You can use drywall nails or drywall screws. Screws are better because they cause much less damage to the internal structure of the drywall sheet during installation. Install fasteners every 9 inches on the perimeter, and every 12 inches in the field. If necessary, use a piece of plywood or one-by lumber for a backing and fastening surface behind any drywall edges that don't fall over framing.
While there are currently no government regulations in the United States dictating procedures, two certifying bodies, the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) and the RIA, do recommend standards of care. The current IICRC standard is ANSI/IICRC S500-2015.[9] It is the collaborative work of the IICRC, SCRT, IEI, IAQA, and NADCA.
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