Water is pumped out of your home or property to our recovery tank mounted inside our truck, ready for proper disposal. Standing water is removed, allowing our water extraction team inside your property to assess damage to all structures, furniture, and personal items, inspect your property to traces of mold, and to set up equipment designed to quickly dry the property.
Accurate mold and tooling component assembly is a critical step in mold repair—and is the origin of many preventable, unscheduled mold stops (breakdowns). Poor workmanship and mistakes are usually a result of too much speed, lack of focus or physical skills, and disorganized work habits. If several repair techs are involved in the assembly of a mold, communication breakdowns between them can require the mold to be disassembled yet again to correct an oversight or install something that was forgotten.

Once any standing water has been removed, it’s time to start drying out the home. Your contractor will bring in different types of air movers (think of these like glorified fans) to help circulate airflow throughout the room. Don’t be surprised if they need to lift up a section of the carpet or position one of the air movers at certain sections of the walls to ensure air is getting to the most saturated parts of the room. If you have hardwood floors, they may use floor mats which help draw the water out of the floor. If needed, they might even remove the baseboards and drill holes into the drywall to help the walls dry faster. While some of these methods may sound extreme, they’re making every effort to dry the home without having to demolish and rebuild, which could add multiple weeks to the project timeline and become very costly.
On average, it costs around $2,300 for mold removal. Mold spores are found in almost all environments and begin growing in just 24 to 48 hours when moisture is present. All types of water damage come with a risk of fungal growth. The longer moisture sits, the greater the risk and cost of removal. Only a qualified inspector should test for mold. An inspector can help determine if there is any and if professional remediation is needed.
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Melting Ice & Snow: With spring comes nicer weather, but also the occasional risk of flooding in areas that cannot fully absorb all the water. When temperatures fluctuate from day to day, melted ice can refreeze and cause a whole other set of problems. Due to this hazard, it is extremely important to keep an eye on the weather and fix the problem as soon as it occurs.
Category 2 Water - Refers to a source of water that contains a significant degree of chemical, biological or physical contaminants and causes discomfort or sickness when consumed or even exposed to. Known as "grey water". This type carries microorganisms and nutrients of micro-organisms. Examples are toilet bowls with urine (no feces), sump pump failures, seepage due to hydrostatic failure and water discharge from dishwashers or washing machines.
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