Category 2 Water - Refers to a source of water that contains a significant degree of chemical, biological or physical contaminants and causes discomfort or sickness when consumed or even exposed to. Known as "grey water". This type carries microorganisms and nutrients of micro-organisms. Examples are toilet bowls with urine (no feces), sump pump failures, seepage due to hydrostatic failure and water discharge from dishwashers or washing machines.


If the moisture damage has been neglected or gone unnoticed for long, you’re likely to find rot. Where possible, remove and replace soft, spongy studs and wall sheathing. Where removal is difficult, treat the affected areas with a wood preservative (available at home centers), after cleaning the wood and allowing it to dry. Then double up rotted members with pressure-treated wood.


Once any standing water has been removed, it’s time to start drying out the home. Your contractor will bring in different types of air movers (think of these like glorified fans) to help circulate airflow throughout the room. Don’t be surprised if they need to lift up a section of the carpet or position one of the air movers at certain sections of the walls to ensure air is getting to the most saturated parts of the room. If you have hardwood floors, they may use floor mats which help draw the water out of the floor. If needed, they might even remove the baseboards and drill holes into the drywall to help the walls dry faster. While some of these methods may sound extreme, they’re making every effort to dry the home without having to demolish and rebuild, which could add multiple weeks to the project timeline and become very costly.

Homeowners insurance may help cover damage caused by leaking plumbing if the leak is sudden and accidental, such as if a washing machine supply hose suddenly breaks or a pipe bursts. However, homeowners insurance does not cover damage resulting from poor maintenance. So, if damage results after you fail to repair a leaky toilet, for example, homeowners insurance likely will not pay for repairs.

If you’re dealing with anything other than a large incursion, you understandably may be considering handling the cleanup and drying yourself to save money or time. The problem is that cleaning up and recovering from water damage isn’t always as straightforward as it seems. This post highlights 3 key things you need to be aware of when addressing water damage from a minor clean water (or Category 1) incursion.
Mr. Restore is a water damage restoration company that serves the Dallas area. We have more than 50 years of experience in restoration and reconstruction. We can be of assistance during stressful disaster situations. Our dedicated team is committed to handling every project with precision and care, as well as delivering the best customer service around. No matter what your emergency might be, whether it’s water damage as the result of leaking pipes, sink or toilet overflow, or broken appliances, our team is here for you to offer high-quality restoration services at affordable prices.

Almost every home gets mold infestations. The trick is to mold remediation is to get to them before they get big and harm both you and your home. In this article, you’ll learn about mold remediation and how to get rid of mold, how to get rid of black mold and what kills mold. We’ll show you how to identify mold, how to eliminate the small infestations as well as the big ones that have gotten out of hand and how to clean mold. We’ll also answer the question: Does bleach kill mold?
If your home or business is flooded, make sure to call a flood damage cleanup professional immediately.  The water damage will continue to spread the longer you do not take action and there is a good chance that the flood water contains sewage which can contribute to health problems.  Call us at 1-888-915-8868 or use the form on the right of the page to locate a flood damage restoration expert near you.
You can easily spot the most visible type of mold, called mildew, which begins as tiny, usually black spots but often grows into larger colonies. It’s the black stuff you see in the grout lines in your shower, on damp walls, and outdoors on the surfaces of deck boards and painted siding, especially in damp and shady areas. A mildewed surface is often difficult to distinguish from a dirty one. To test for mildew, simply dab a few drops of household bleach on the blackened area. If it lightens after one to two minutes, you have mildew. If the area remains dark, you probably have dirt.
Black water contains pathogenic agents and is grossly unsanitary. Anyone with a compromised immune system, respiratory problems, or allergies, as well as young children and the elderly must remain off the job site until the building is judged safe for occupancy. Black water includes sewage and other contaminated water sources entering or affecting the indoor environment, such as: toilet backflows, flooding from seawater, ground surface water, and rising river water. Category 3 water can contain contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals, or toxic substances.

Once a region has been officially declared a “disaster area” by government authorities, property owners have access to increased resources, including public services to protect and remediate the area. In addition, you may have access to financial assistance. Your insurance company will have additional information on this or you can contact FEMA directly.

HEPA air scrubbers remove contaminants from the air. This is an especially important piece of fire damage restoration equipment, as lingering soot particles can lead to health problems in a structure’s inhabitants after a fire. Commercial air scrubbers are also important in mold remediation when filtering mold spores from the contaminated environment. HEPA filtration ensures that even the smallest soot or mold particles are removed from the air.
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