How much drywall should you replace if you have drywall water damage? Generally speaking, if drywall has swelled or sagged 3/8 of an inch or more from the baseline, then you need to replace the entire sheet. Otherwise, you can cut out and water damage repair the water-stained portion. And remember to check the insulation behind the drywall for damage as well.
If you have to remove mold concentrations or perform any black mold removal covering more than a few square feet, where the musty odor is strong or where you find extensive water damage, we recommend that you take special precautions. You want to not only avoid contaminating the rest of the house but also protect yourself from breathing high concentrations of spores and VOCs.

Wear a respirator or a facemask rated for black mold spore protection, and cover arms, legs and hands to avoid contact with mold spores. Use soap and a sponge to remove visible mold. If the moldy area is dry, lightly spray with water, as this will reduce the incidence of airborne mold spores during cleaning. Next, use commercial black mold removal products, which can be found in most hardware or home repair stores, to disinfect the moldy areas, in addition to any adjacent areas. If you use bleach, make sure it won't discolor the material or surface. Place all sponges, equipment and other materials used in cleaning in a heavy duty garbage bag, and if possible, remove the bag through an nearby exit as opposed to the main house, to avoid distributing mold spores.
When it comes to a flood or water damage emergency in your home, every minute counts. If floodwater inside your home is not dealt with quickly, your walls, as well as your carpet, flooring, ceiling and personal property can quickly become waterlogged and damaged beyond repair. Flooded zones can quickly become unsafe for human exposure. Consider that dangerous bacteria begin to multiply in wet environments, not to mention rot and mold growth. All it takes is a few inches of water to create a serious threat to your home or office. The harmful effects of water damage can be reduced greatly by the prompt and reliable emergency flood services from Roto-Rooter.

One of the simplest proactive steps is getting an annual plumbing inspection. These are often free or free with other services. The plumber will inspect all visible plumbing including fixtures, pipes, appliances, and drains. They diagnose and fix small problems before they become big ones. They can also tell you the best time to replace worn fixtures and appliances.
Over a quarter of a million American homes each year will suffer from damage due to frozen or burst pipes. A frozen, broken or leaky pipe are all inconveniences that can lead to major headaches for your home. Ignoring these repairs can be extremely costly as basement water damage can lead to an unstable structure and damage of your valuables. When you need flood damage cleanup with a burst or frozen pipe or are dealing with flooding at all, give us a call today!
If you’re dealing with anything other than a large incursion, you understandably may be considering handling the cleanup and drying yourself to save money or time. The problem is that cleaning up and recovering from water damage isn’t always as straightforward as it seems. This post highlights 3 key things you need to be aware of when addressing water damage from a minor clean water (or Category 1) incursion.
As soon as you have a water emergency on your hands, all you need to do is call your water restoration company. They are available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week because they know that water emergencies can happen any time of the night or day. Your restoration professionals start to work immediately to stop any further damage from happening to your home.
Water damage can originate by different sources such as a broken dishwasher hose, a washing machine overflow, a dishwasher leakage, broken/leaking pipes, flood waters and clogged toilets. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, 13.7% of all water used in the home today can be attributed to plumbing leaks.[3] On average that is approximately 10,000 gallons of water per year wasted by leaks for each US home. A tiny, 1/8-inch crack in a pipe can release up to 250 gallons of water a day.[4] According to Claims Magazine in August 2000, broken water pipes ranked second to hurricanes in terms of both the number of homes damaged and the amount of claims (on average $50,000 per insurance claim[citation needed]) costs in the US.[5] Experts suggest that homeowners inspect and replace worn pipe fittings and hose connections to all household appliances that use water at least once a year. This includes washing machines, dishwashers, kitchen sinks and bathroom lavatories, refrigerator icemakers, water softeners and humidifiers. A few US companies offer whole-house leak protection systems utilizing flow-based technologies. A number of insurance companies offer policy holders reduced rates for installing a whole-house leak protection system.
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