The information and advice contained in this article is intended as a general guide for informational purposes only. It does not take into account your personal situation. While we at Resolve have significant experience and history operating in the home restoration industry and working closely with construction contractors, we are not licensed as a general or specialty contractor. We encourage you to consider the information we’ve provided but urge you not to rely upon it in place of appropriate professional advice from a licensed, experienced construction contractor.    
Inspect damaged materials for mold and mildew. Mold can start to grow in the right conditions in as little as 24 hours. For long-term issues, like mold caused by attic condensation, the mold may have started growing a long time ago. And if you find mold and mildew issues, you need to be very careful. Some mold is toxic to humans, and all mold is very damaging to the materials it infests. For small mold issues, cut out the material, bag it, and throw it away immediately. For serious mold issues, get out of the area, shut down any airflow (to avoid spore contamination) and call a professional. And keep in mind that mold can show up in hidden areas like inside walls or under floors, so this inspection and water damage repair will be ongoing.

How much drywall should you replace if you have drywall water damage? Generally speaking, if drywall has swelled or sagged 3/8 of an inch or more from the baseline, then you need to replace the entire sheet. Otherwise, you can cut out and water damage repair the water-stained portion. And remember to check the insulation behind the drywall for damage as well.

Wanna keep things really cheap? Do it yourself! In some cases, minor mold problems (less than about 10 square feet of mold) in places like a bathroom corner can easily be handled by a handy homeowner with a free weekend afternoon and a few basic supplies from the hardware store. For more information, see our previous post on the subject: Do I need a Mold Remediation Professional?
AlabamaFloridaKentuckyMississippiNew MexicoPennsylvaniaVermontArizonaGeorgiaLouisianaMissouriNew YorkRhode IslandVirginiaCaliforniaIdahoMaineMontanaNorth CarolinaSouth CarolinaWashingtonColoradoIllinoisMarylandNebraskaNorth DakotaSouth DakotaWest VirginiaConnecticutIndianaMassachusettsNevadaOhioTennesseeWisconsinDelawareIowaMichiganNew HampshireOklahomaTexasWyomingDistrict of ColumbiaKansasMinnesotaNew JerseyOregonUtah
You have to open up the wall to get at the mold growing inside. Since you have to repair the wall anyway, don’t hesitate to cut the drywall back beyond the obvious damage to find all the mold and let the wall dry out. To avoid cutting electrical wires, poke a hole through the damaged section and locate the wires first. Turn off the power to the outlets before you cut. Mist the moldy drywall and insulation with the pump sprayer to avoid spreading mold spores. Double-bag moldy material in heavy-duty plastic bags and tie them shut.
When left to sit for long periods of time, especially if the homeowners temporarily relocate while recovering from a house fire, further structural damage can complicate matters—making it difficult to return life back to normal. Calling in a water damage repair company is an excellent preventative measure for reducing the risk of further problems and headaches.

It’s important to understand the differences because Category 2 and Category 3 water present health risks to your employees and customers and need to be handled differently. The most likely sources of clean water would be water from a pipe, water heater, steam lines or even rainwater. The basic rule of thumb is that it should look and smell like tap water.
It’s important to understand the differences because Category 2 and Category 3 water present health risks to your employees and customers and need to be handled differently. The most likely sources of clean water would be water from a pipe, water heater, steam lines or even rainwater. The basic rule of thumb is that it should look and smell like tap water.
Drywall repair cost about $500 on average with a typical range of $250 to $750, but can cost much more or less depending on the destruction. It is used in most modern homes and is found in almost all finished areas of a house, including bathrooms. When it becomes wet, it typically needs to be replaced. Not only is the drywall itself ruined, but the wet paper backer of the drywall becomes an excellent environment for mold growth.
Mold can develop within 24 to 48 hours of a flood, says Ashley Small of FEMA, so remove wet contents, including carpeting and bedding, as soon as possible. If an item has been wet for less than 48 hours, it may be salvageable. However, you’ll need to decide whether it holds enough monetary or sentimental value to try to do so. And notify your insurance company before removing items to ensure that you’re not affecting coverage. Always photograph the flood-soaked items.

The resulting damage is a different than the initial damage.For example, if water damage resulting from a broken pipe, or appliance is listed in your wording as covered, then you may be compensated for a portion of the damages caused even though the deteriorated pipe replacement or a new appliance would not be covered. This is an example the cause of the damage not being covered, but the resulting damage being covered.
In the United States, those individuals who are affected by widescale flooding may have the ability to apply for government and FEMA grants through the Individual Assistance program.[1] On a larger level, businesses, cities, and communities can apply to the FEMA Public Assistance program for funds to assist after a large flood. For example, the city of Fond du Lac Wisconsin received $1.2 million FEMA grant after flooding in June 2008. The program allows the city to purchase the water damaged properties, demolish the structures, and turn the properties into public green space.[2]
×