After a mold has been cleaned, repaired, changed over, and final-checked, it needs to be given a new status and moved to one of three areas—typically racked in holding/storage area, reset in the press, or staged as a back-up mold in a molding-cell operation. It could also go to an outside vender for rebuild or production. You should know where your molds are.
For instance, if you remove 16 ejector pins from a mold and notice that a couple of them feel tight, will you remember which ones were tight later on, when you peruse past records to discover that galling pins have been a problem for the past five production runs? Knowing this information before you split or disassemble a mold removes some of the guesswork involved when looking for the root cause.
It’s important to understand the differences because Category 2 and Category 3 water present health risks to your employees and customers and need to be handled differently. The most likely sources of clean water would be water from a pipe, water heater, steam lines or even rainwater. The basic rule of thumb is that it should look and smell like tap water.

The U.S. Navy has a similar approach when working on jet engines. Engines requiring repairs are not simply yanked from the air frame and disassembled without first creating, then discussing, the maintenance plan or objectives with the shop boss. This keeps things flowing smoothly in a hanger where there would always be several jets in various stages of repair. It was much the same as a mold shop where a group of repair technicians work on multiple molds during the day or week, sharing equipment, tools, and space.

Once you discover moisture, your first instinct may be to open windows to help with the drying process, but it may not be your best move. For example, if your building is mechanically ventilated, the systems need constant pressure levels to work correctly. You also want to avoid excess coolness or heat and humidity, or you may end up complicating the drying process.
Showers, tubs, sinks, toilets, windows, and doors. Water leaks around bathtubs, showers, sinks, and toilets can cause damage because the leak is often out of sight. To prevent leaks, make sure you have a watertight seal of caulk around tubs, sinks, toilets, tubs, shower stalls, windows, and doors. Cracks or mold on caulk or tile grout may indicate that you don't have a watertight seal. Remove all caulk or grout, clean and dry the surface thoroughly, and apply fresh caulk. Don't apply new caulk or grout on top of the old materials.
Appliance hoses. Broken hoses are among the most common causes of water damage. Regularly inspect hoses and hose fittings on washing machines, icemakers, and dishwashers for kinks, cracks, bulges, or deterioration. Replace standard rubber washing machine hoses every two to five years or more often if they are showing signs of wear. Consider using steel-reinforced hoses for longer life.

Black water contains pathogenic agents and is grossly unsanitary. Anyone with a compromised immune system, respiratory problems, or allergies, as well as young children and the elderly must remain off the job site until the building is judged safe for occupancy. Black water includes sewage and other contaminated water sources entering or affecting the indoor environment, such as: toilet backflows, flooding from seawater, ground surface water, and rising river water. Category 3 water can contain contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals, or toxic substances.
Black water contains pathogenic agents and is grossly unsanitary. Anyone with a compromised immune system, respiratory problems, or allergies, as well as young children and the elderly must remain off the job site until the building is judged safe for occupancy. Black water includes sewage and other contaminated water sources entering or affecting the indoor environment, such as: toilet backflows, flooding from seawater, ground surface water, and rising river water. Category 3 water can contain contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals, or toxic substances.
Insurance is offered by Safeco Insurance Company of America and/or its affiliates, with their principal place of business at 175 Berkeley Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116. This website provides a simplified description of coverage. Nothing stated herein creates a contract. All statements made are subject to the provisions, exclusions, conditions and limitations of the applicable insurance policy. Please refer to actual policy forms for complete details regarding the coverage discussed. If the information in these materials conflicts with the policy language that it describes, the policy language prevails. Coverages and features not available in all states. Eligibility is subject to meeting applicable underwriting criteria.

For instance, if you remove 16 ejector pins from a mold and notice that a couple of them feel tight, will you remember which ones were tight later on, when you peruse past records to discover that galling pins have been a problem for the past five production runs? Knowing this information before you split or disassemble a mold removes some of the guesswork involved when looking for the root cause.


Water damage can originate by different sources such as a broken dishwasher hose, a washing machine overflow, a dishwasher leakage, broken/leaking pipes, flood waters and clogged toilets. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, 13.7% of all water used in the home today can be attributed to plumbing leaks.[3] On average that is approximately 10,000 gallons of water per year wasted by leaks for each US home. A tiny, 1/8-inch crack in a pipe can release up to 250 gallons of water a day.[4] According to Claims Magazine in August 2000, broken water pipes ranked second to hurricanes in terms of both the number of homes damaged and the amount of claims (on average $50,000 per insurance claim[citation needed]) costs in the US.[5] Experts suggest that homeowners inspect and replace worn pipe fittings and hose connections to all household appliances that use water at least once a year. This includes washing machines, dishwashers, kitchen sinks and bathroom lavatories, refrigerator icemakers, water softeners and humidifiers. A few US companies offer whole-house leak protection systems utilizing flow-based technologies. A number of insurance companies offer policy holders reduced rates for installing a whole-house leak protection system.
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