The insurance company must start investigating your claim within 15 days after receiving written notice and may ask you for more information. Once you send the information, the insurance company has 15 business days to accept or reject your claim. If the insurance company says it will pay your claim, it must pay within five business days. If the insurance company rejects your claim, it must explain its reasons in writing.

Mold can develop within 24 to 48 hours of a flood, says Ashley Small of FEMA, so remove wet contents, including carpeting and bedding, as soon as possible. If an item has been wet for less than 48 hours, it may be salvageable. However, you’ll need to decide whether it holds enough monetary or sentimental value to try to do so. And notify your insurance company before removing items to ensure that you’re not affecting coverage. Always photograph the flood-soaked items.
Category 3 Water - Known as "black water" and is grossly unsanitary. This water contains unsanitary agents, harmful bacteria and fungi, causing severe discomfort or sickness. Type 3 category are contaminated water sources that affect the indoor environment. This category includes water sources from sewage, seawater, rising water from rivers or streams, ground surface water or standing water. Category 2 Water or Grey Water that is not promptly removed from the structure and or have remained stagnant may be re classified as Category 3 Water. Toilet back flows that originates from beyond the toilet trap is considered black water contamination regardless of visible content or color.[6]
Water damage is a problem that most property owners dread. When it rains heavily or snow melts quickly, the risk of this type of damage increases. Water can cause thousands of dollars’ worth of damage by damaging wood furniture, upholstery, electronics, household appliances, and plumbing equipment. Water damage also increases the risk of mold growth, which is a very expensive problem to remediate. Hiring a water damage restoration company can make the cleanup process easier to handle, as these companies employ experienced workers who know the best ways to repair or replace damaged items and help with water damage cleanup.
The resulting damage is a different than the initial damage.For example, if water damage resulting from a broken pipe, or appliance is listed in your wording as covered, then you may be compensated for a portion of the damages caused even though the deteriorated pipe replacement or a new appliance would not be covered. This is an example the cause of the damage not being covered, but the resulting damage being covered.
From wet carpets to swollen floorboards, it’s often evident when water has damaged your floor. But if you aren’t sure, it’s important to check immediately in case moisture has become trapped underneath. Note that underlayment and padding are particularly susceptible to water damage and must usually be removed. However, this also presents an opportunity to install new, waterproof flooring in the area. Ceramic tile, high-end vinyl and certain engineered wood materials can all help protect floors against future water damage repair.
Mold is a major-league nuisance. It blackens the grout lines in your shower, discolors drywall, shows up as black spots on siding, darkens decks, and grows on and rots damp wood everywhere. Even worse, it can be bad for your health. Mold releases microscopic spores that cause allergic reactions, runny noses and sneezing, as well as irritating, even injurious, odors. We’ll cover how to remove mold, how to get rid of black mold, how to kill mold on wood and what kills mold in a few steps.

No need to take a wrecking ball to the entire house at the sight of a little mold.  You can keep the price down by focusing just on the area where there is visible mold.  For example, mold on drywall in one corner of the room only needs cut out and replaced in that corner.  Yes, the rest of the room (and maybe adjoining rooms) should be cleaned, but only damaged drywall needs to be cut out and replaced.
Our highly trained technicians are ready to respond immediately to flood or water damage at your Columbus property. We have the experience, expertise, and training to restore your home or business quickly and properly. We use advanced inspection and extraction equipment to find the water and remove it as quickly as possible. Our technicians will monitor and document the drying process to ensure your property is back to normal.
If your home or business is flooded, make sure to call a flood damage cleanup professional immediately.  The water damage will continue to spread the longer you do not take action and there is a good chance that the flood water contains sewage which can contribute to health problems.  Call us at 1-888-915-8868 or use the form on the right of the page to locate a flood damage restoration expert near you.

The insurance company will pay to repair your home with materials of like kind and quality to the original. For example, if the carpet was damaged, the insurance company will pay to replace the damaged carpet with carpet of a similar grade and quality. If you choose to upgrade the carpet or change the type of flooring, you will have to pay the extra costs yourself.
It’s important to understand the differences because Category 2 and Category 3 water present health risks to your employees and customers and need to be handled differently. The most likely sources of clean water would be water from a pipe, water heater, steam lines or even rainwater. The basic rule of thumb is that it should look and smell like tap water.

All water damage restoration jobs are unique and the amount of work required for each depends on a variety of factors such as the amount of area in the home that’s been damaged and how long the water has been present. Once a professional water damage cleanup vendor arrives and has a chance to inspect the home, they’ll be able to put together a detailed project timeline specific to your job. In the meantime, we’ve listed the eight common phases that occur during the water damage restoration process and what happens in each, so you’ll know what to expect.
While there are currently no government regulations in the United States dictating procedures, two certifying bodies, the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) and the RIA, do recommend standards of care. The current IICRC standard is ANSI/IICRC S500-2015.[9] It is the collaborative work of the IICRC, SCRT, IEI, IAQA, and NADCA.
×