Appliance hoses. Broken hoses are among the most common causes of water damage. Regularly inspect hoses and hose fittings on washing machines, icemakers, and dishwashers for kinks, cracks, bulges, or deterioration. Replace standard rubber washing machine hoses every two to five years or more often if they are showing signs of wear. Consider using steel-reinforced hoses for longer life.
Your insurance company will only pay for additional living expenses up to your policy's ALE dollar limits. Because repairs on your home can sometimes take months, monitor your expenses carefully to make sure you have enough ALE to cover the entire time you’ll be out of your home. If you reach your policy's ALE dollar limits before your home is fully repaired, you’ll have to pay the rest of the expenses out of your own pocket.
Water is pumped out of your home or property to our recovery tank mounted inside our truck, ready for proper disposal. Standing water is removed, allowing our water extraction team inside your property to assess damage to all structures, furniture, and personal items, inspect your property to traces of mold, and to set up equipment designed to quickly dry the property.
You can find out how old your water heater is by looking up the serial number on the manufacturer’s sticker near the top of the water heater. Make sure to regularly inspect your water heater to check for signs of moisture build-up, mold or corrosion. If your water isn’t as hot as it used to be or there’s rust coming from your faucets, it’s time to call a plumber or water heater specialist.
We are the most trusted name in property damage restoration because we don’t outsource and you can trust our workers when they are in your home. They are specially trained and industry certified. You will be assigned a Project Manager who will walk you through the entire process step-by-step.  The team leader is plugged into your job every single day. No exceptions.
Water damage can originate by different sources such as a broken dishwasher hose, a washing machine overflow, a dishwasher leakage, broken/leaking pipes, flood waters and clogged toilets. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, 13.7% of all water used in the home today can be attributed to plumbing leaks.[3] On average that is approximately 10,000 gallons of water per year wasted by leaks for each US home. A tiny, 1/8-inch crack in a pipe can release up to 250 gallons of water a day.[4] According to Claims Magazine in August 2000, broken water pipes ranked second to hurricanes in terms of both the number of homes damaged and the amount of claims (on average $50,000 per insurance claim[citation needed]) costs in the US.[5] Experts suggest that homeowners inspect and replace worn pipe fittings and hose connections to all household appliances that use water at least once a year. This includes washing machines, dishwashers, kitchen sinks and bathroom lavatories, refrigerator icemakers, water softeners and humidifiers. A few US companies offer whole-house leak protection systems utilizing flow-based technologies. A number of insurance companies offer policy holders reduced rates for installing a whole-house leak protection system.
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