During the walkthrough, compile a list of flooded equipment to help you estimate man-power requirements and create a preliminary schedule of repair work. As mobilization of crews begins, start developing job strategies, such as finding office space, living accommodations, and transportation for crews. You must also think about arranging food/catering services and developing work schedules. Once your crews have been mobilized and job-site safety requirements are met (see SIDEBAR: Developing a Safety Plan Following a Natural Disaster), it's time to go to work.

Roofs should be inspected annually. A professional roof contractor can look for exterior and interior warning signs that your roof’s condition may lead to water damage, including cracked or missing shingles and areas where water is prone to pool. An inspection can cost several hundred dollars, but in exchange for your peace of mind, it’s priceless.

When a disaster of this magnitude occurs, the first things a plant will need are lighting and pumps. This requires the use of on-site generators and temporary power connections. It's highly recommended to not allow the plant distribution system to be back-fed. If a motor is required to turn a pump, a portable motor starter fed by the generator should be installed on a temporary panel next to the motor.
Once you get the OK from your insurer to remove the water, use a sump pump, available from most hardware or home supply stores for $150 to $500, and a wet vac ($40 to $130). Ramirez cautions that water is heavy—a cubic foot weight 10 lbs.—so be careful not to injure yourself, especially if you’re carrying buckets of water up and down stairs. Open doors and windows to allow fresh air to circulate so long as that won’t allow in more water. 
In the United States, those individuals who are affected by widescale flooding may have the ability to apply for government and FEMA grants through the Individual Assistance program.[1] On a larger level, businesses, cities, and communities can apply to the FEMA Public Assistance program for funds to assist after a large flood. For example, the city of Fond du Lac Wisconsin received $1.2 million FEMA grant after flooding in June 2008. The program allows the city to purchase the water damaged properties, demolish the structures, and turn the properties into public green space.[2]
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