For instance, if you remove 16 ejector pins from a mold and notice that a couple of them feel tight, will you remember which ones were tight later on, when you peruse past records to discover that galling pins have been a problem for the past five production runs? Knowing this information before you split or disassemble a mold removes some of the guesswork involved when looking for the root cause.
Gradual damage is when something happens slowly over time and causes damage to your property. Gradual damage due to water damage is a common problem when it comes to insurance claims. An example of gradual damage is when something happens slowly, like paint chipping off a wall it starts with a small chip, then eventually half the wall is uncovered.
Assessing the severity of the damage is important for determining what is needed to start water damage repair and water removal. There are several different categories assigned to water damage. Category 1 refers to clean water, or water that does not pose a threat to humans. Possible causes of this type of damage include broken appliances or sink overflows. Category 2 water is also called gray water. This means that the water is contaminated and may cause sickness of ingested. This type of water contains microorganisms. Broken toilets, broken sump pumps, and seepage may cause category 2 water damage. Category 3 water is known as black water. This type of water is unsanitary, as it contains bacteria and other organisms that cause sickness. The possible sources of black water damage include sewage problems and contamination of standing water.
If you repair damage resulting from an appliance-related leak, you need to get a Certificate of Appliance-Related Water Damage Remediation (WDR-1). The certificate verifies that the damage was properly replaced or repaired and that any related physical damage was properly remediated, repaired, or replaced. If you don't have the repairs or remediation certified by a WDR-1, an insurance company can deny you coverage in the future based on previous appliance-related damage or claims.
Indoor and outdoor pipes and faucets. Routinely check indoor pipes under cabinets and sinks for leaks, rust, and any signs of deterioration. Minimize the potential for water damage from frozen and broken outdoor pipes by insulating supply lines (in attics, crawlspaces, and exterior walls), protecting exposed outdoor faucets, sealing gaps in exterior walls, and maintaining adequate heat in your home.
It’s time for one of the most important steps: removing any standing water from the home. The removal process is actually much less complicated than you may think. Contractors use fancy shop vacuums and rotate them around the room, sucking up all the water that’s present in the area. The amount of time this phase takes varies depending on the type of substrate that’s being dried, the size of the room and the total amount of water that’s present.

Cut through the paper facing of the drywall sheet with a razor knife. Cut along the drawn lines. Break the drywall along the face cut, and fold the drywall slightly to make a crease in the paper backing of the drywall sheet. Cut through the crease in the backing paper with a razor knife from the backside of the drywall sheet, and remove the unwanted portion of drywall. To make cuts that are perpendicular to each other, use a keyhole saw for the shorter of the two cuts, and then fold and cut the drywall.
The longer water damage sits untreated, the more likely it is that additional damage can occur. If it’s determined that drying equipment is needed, dehumidifiers will often be placed in the home to prevent against further damage like mold growth while the vendor is waiting for approval from the insurance company, if one is involved. Dehumidifiers can be present for one or multiple nights depending on factors such as the length of time the water has been present and the source of the leak. The contractor working on your home will be able to assess how long the dehumidifiers are needed.
Appliance hoses. Broken hoses are among the most common causes of water damage. Regularly inspect hoses and hose fittings on washing machines, icemakers, and dishwashers for kinks, cracks, bulges, or deterioration. Replace standard rubber washing machine hoses every two to five years or more often if they are showing signs of wear. Consider using steel-reinforced hoses for longer life.
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It’s important to get rid of all moisture ASAP before it causes more damage. And for small leaks, this may not be difficult, but it’s important to be thorough. Use fans to circulate air in the affected area. For larger projects, consider renting a large-capacity dehumidifier to really dry out surrounding wood, carpet, and other materials. You don’t want any moisture left after your water damage repair.
“Last December we discovered a leak underneath our kitchen that caused extensive damage. We called WaterBear and they came out that day. The people who came to our house were always respectful, kind and efficient. They did exactly what they quoted us and did it in a timely manner. All of our questions and concerns were answered in a timely manner, also.   They helped us through this very difficult situation. I hope we never have another problem like this, but if we did, I would call WaterBear.” – Anne M.
To prevent water damage, you should replace your washing machine supply hose at least once every five years. Also, resist the temptation to overload your washing machine. Constantly stuffing too many clothes into your washing machine could loosen gaskets and valves or cause cracks. Take good care of your washing machine and your washing machine will take good care of you.
If the home is habitable, take precautions to keep yourself and your family safe from injury. Use flashlights to move around dark rooms, for example. If the home isn’t habitable, don’t try to stay there. Move to a shelter or alternate location. Consult your insurer to find out what provisions the company will make for temporary housing while your home is being repaired.
The methods for dealing with damage to walls depend on the type of materials and also what’s behind those materials. Drywall can often be salvaged, when you respond quickly to damage. You can purchase moisture meters that allow you to assess structural integrity. If the integrity checks out then your drying approach will depend on wall contents. If the wall has insulation, you will need to use flood cuts. If there is no insulation, then usually the best method is to create weep holes. And if you’re dealing with a firewall, you’ll want to use staggered cuts.
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