Category 2 Water - Refers to a source of water that contains a significant degree of chemical, biological or physical contaminants and causes discomfort or sickness when consumed or even exposed to. Known as "grey water". This type carries microorganisms and nutrients of micro-organisms. Examples are toilet bowls with urine (no feces), sump pump failures, seepage due to hydrostatic failure and water discharge from dishwashers or washing machines.
Locate and repair the source of the leak. The source of the problem is usually apparent once you remove the drywall and expose the framing. If the leak source is not easily determined, consult a licensed contractor before you replace the drywall. You must repair the cause of the leak or mold and mildew will eventually reform over the new drywall. An unresolved leak may also create additional damage to framing, insulation, siding and flooring.

If temperatures tend to freeze in your area, be sure to protect your pipes. Insulate both hot and cold water pipes using heat tape or pipe sleeves available in your home improvement store. If you have water supply lines in your garage, keep the garage door closed as often as possible. Open kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate. If you plan to spend some time away from your home, leave the heat on and set your thermostat to at least 55 degrees. You can’t control the weather, but you can put up a good fight to save your pipes.


To prevent water damage, you should replace your washing machine supply hose at least once every five years. Also, resist the temptation to overload your washing machine. Constantly stuffing too many clothes into your washing machine could loosen gaskets and valves or cause cracks. Take good care of your washing machine and your washing machine will take good care of you.
A leaky faucet, cracked bathtub, or failing toilet can easily become a much larger and costlier problem. A 120-square foot bathroom can cost as much as $3,000 to clean up and repair. Homeowners spend an average of about $300 when hiring a plumber, but can save thousands in future expenses. More importantly, homeowner's insurance typically does not cover damage due to ignored maintenance issues.
Once you discover moisture, your first instinct may be to open windows to help with the drying process, but it may not be your best move. For example, if your building is mechanically ventilated, the systems need constant pressure levels to work correctly. You also want to avoid excess coolness or heat and humidity, or you may end up complicating the drying process.
Water damage is one of the most common causes of home insurance claims. According to ISO, Water damage claims are the second largest frequent insurance claim, following wind and hail damage. The percentage of claims due to water damage is also increasing, while other causes of damage have stayed fairly consistent or even decreased. It's no wonder people have a lot of questions about water damage and what is covered on home insurance, and why things, like "gradual damage" are not covered. Things get even more complicated when we look at the exceptions.
When the next water damage call comes in for a flood cleanup due to a broken water pipe or drain backup, make sure you have all the commercial restoration equipment on hand that you need to tackle the job in a moment’s notice. Events like floods, hurricanes, wildfires and other natural disasters can leave homes and businesses in peril and in need of professional restoration services.

The water restoration process is an important one. Using the right procedures and materials can help people save cherished belongings and even prevent their homes from being condemned. Water restoration companies specialize in mitigating the effects of water, but the success for water damage restoration depends on the severity of the damage and the amount of water that caused the damage. Water restoration companies may hire outside experts to assess a property and determine a water restoration and water removal plan. These water restoration companies typically use high-tech equipment and well-documented procedures to control water damage. Water in basement areas may only require a short cleanup process, but water in other areas of a property will require extensive remediation.

If the home is habitable, take precautions to keep yourself and your family safe from injury. Use flashlights to move around dark rooms, for example. If the home isn’t habitable, don’t try to stay there. Move to a shelter or alternate location. Consult your insurer to find out what provisions the company will make for temporary housing while your home is being repaired.
Though a competent DIY homeowner may be able to clean up and repair some damage, it's important to have a professional assess it first to determine the extent and any underlying conditions. Missing even a small amount, or its causes, can lead to costlier repairs later. Even small quantities of moisture may result in mold growth. Plus, undiagnosed causes will lead to recurrences. For instance, fixing a damaged ceiling but not the leaky roof that caused it will only lead to another wrecked ceiling.
While there are currently no government regulations in the United States dictating procedures, two certifying bodies, the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) and the RIA, do recommend standards of care. The current IICRC standard is ANSI/IICRC S500-2015.[9] It is the collaborative work of the IICRC, SCRT, IEI, IAQA, and NADCA.
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