“Last December we discovered a leak underneath our kitchen that caused extensive damage. We called WaterBear and they came out that day. The people who came to our house were always respectful, kind and efficient. They did exactly what they quoted us and did it in a timely manner. All of our questions and concerns were answered in a timely manner, also.   They helped us through this very difficult situation. I hope we never have another problem like this, but if we did, I would call WaterBear.” – Anne M.
Molds should never be arbitrarily disassembled without a specific level in mind. To do so is to invite excessive handling of tooling components or over-maintaining a mold, which increases the opportunity for damage and wastes man-hours. Time-based mold disassembly levels (based on cycles, hours, days, or parts produced) should be established to optimize bench time.
Your insurance company will only pay for additional living expenses up to your policy's ALE dollar limits. Because repairs on your home can sometimes take months, monitor your expenses carefully to make sure you have enough ALE to cover the entire time you’ll be out of your home. If you reach your policy's ALE dollar limits before your home is fully repaired, you’ll have to pay the rest of the expenses out of your own pocket.
Want to avoid large cleanup and repair bills? Preventative maintenance and cleaning up quickly after damage are critical to keeping costs down. How long moisture is left untreated increases the scope of the damage and allows mold to grow. Preventing damage by contacting professionals to diagnose causes and make small repairs can save thousands later. Regardless of cause or cost, always document the damage for insurance claims.
It’s important to understand the differences because Category 2 and Category 3 water present health risks to your employees and customers and need to be handled differently. The most likely sources of clean water would be water from a pipe, water heater, steam lines or even rainwater. The basic rule of thumb is that it should look and smell like tap water.
Water damage can originate by different sources such as a broken dishwasher hose, a washing machine overflow, a dishwasher leakage, broken/leaking pipes, flood waters and clogged toilets. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, 13.7% of all water used in the home today can be attributed to plumbing leaks.[3] On average that is approximately 10,000 gallons of water per year wasted by leaks for each US home. A tiny, 1/8-inch crack in a pipe can release up to 250 gallons of water a day.[4] According to Claims Magazine in August 2000, broken water pipes ranked second to hurricanes in terms of both the number of homes damaged and the amount of claims (on average $50,000 per insurance claim[citation needed]) costs in the US.[5] Experts suggest that homeowners inspect and replace worn pipe fittings and hose connections to all household appliances that use water at least once a year. This includes washing machines, dishwashers, kitchen sinks and bathroom lavatories, refrigerator icemakers, water softeners and humidifiers. A few US companies offer whole-house leak protection systems utilizing flow-based technologies. A number of insurance companies offer policy holders reduced rates for installing a whole-house leak protection system.
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