After you learn how to remove mold, you’ll want to prevent it in the future. The key to stopping most mold is to control dampness. The worst infestations usually occur in damp crawlspaces, in attics and walls where water has leaked in from the outside, and in basements with poor foundation drainage. Stopping leaks, ensuring good ventilation in attics, keeping crawlspaces dry and routing water away from the foundation are the best defenses on how to get rid of mold.
Dalworth Restoration Crews are certified through the IICRC and receive specialized training at our Dallas/Fort Worth Restoration Facility. Our technicians are trained to professionally perform water damage restoration services according to the best practices and ANSI/IICRC S500 standards. Technicians are available 24/7 for emergency water removal, cleanup and content repair, as well as rebuild and restore your water or flood damaged property to pre-loss condition.

With a flexible schedule — the Service teams operates a four-shift schedule for full coverage — we can accommodate both planned and emergency repair and ECN jobs, regardless of whether Decatur originally manufactured the mold or not. We also maintain our own fleet of delivery trucks available for pickup and delivery. The fleet is operational 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to help you keep your production downtime to an absolute minimum.
It’s important to get rid of all moisture ASAP before it causes more damage. And for small leaks, this may not be difficult, but it’s important to be thorough. Use fans to circulate air in the affected area. For larger projects, consider renting a large-capacity dehumidifier to really dry out surrounding wood, carpet, and other materials. You don’t want any moisture left after your water damage repair.
Despite what you might think, a flooded home can be saved rather than razed to the ground, but removing the moisture quickly is key. "The biggest thing is getting in there and getting it cleaned up quickly," says Robyn Kent, claims administrator at Dalworth Restoration, based in Euless, TX. "Closer to the three- to five-day mark is when it becomes questionable, since by then, all the materials have become fragile."
Keep the basement dry as it's the most common place to find damage. Flooding, burst pipes, and even clogged gutters can cause leaks. Pitching the landscape, cleaning the gutters, and installing downspout extensions are simple outdoor fixes. From the inside, install a sump pump and water alarm. Have the basement inspected for waterproofing – or have some installed.
When you’re sure the mold has been eliminated, seal the wood surfaces with pigmented shellac like BIN or an oil-based primer like KILZ. Repaint cleaned wall surfaces with a regular latex paint that contains a mildewcide to help stop future mold growth. Then install new insulation and drywall and nail the trim back on. And keep in mind that if the moisture returns, mold will return.

Most of us are very familiar with lockout/tagout procedures, test-before-touch practices, and applying safety grounds. While these are key safety aspects of putting equipment into an electrically safe condition, there are other safety items that need to be addressed when working in a natural disaster area. Items such as air quality, structural issues, and chemical spill exposure come into play. It is the responsibility of each company to keep its own people safe and supply them with special personal protective equipment (PPE), such as rubber boots, respirators, dust masks, portable gas monitors, and rubber gloves. As a service company, you must also coordinate with plant safety personnel you've contracted with to develop special safety procedures to address the ever-changing site conditions. Frequent safety meetings are a must to keep everyone up to date with the most current hazard conditions on the site.
In addition, it’s important to have a working flashlight and turn off all water and electrical sources within the home, says Dr. Maurice A. Ramirez, author of “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Disaster Preparedness.” Even if the power isn’t operational, it’s a good idea to go to your fuse box and turn off the main, plus all of the individual fuse connections. That way, if the power is reactivated, you’re not at risk for mixing standing water and electricity.
Once any standing water has been removed, it’s time to start drying out the home. Your contractor will bring in different types of air movers (think of these like glorified fans) to help circulate airflow throughout the room. Don’t be surprised if they need to lift up a section of the carpet or position one of the air movers at certain sections of the walls to ensure air is getting to the most saturated parts of the room. If you have hardwood floors, they may use floor mats which help draw the water out of the floor. If needed, they might even remove the baseboards and drill holes into the drywall to help the walls dry faster. While some of these methods may sound extreme, they’re making every effort to dry the home without having to demolish and rebuild, which could add multiple weeks to the project timeline and become very costly.
Cut through the paper facing of the drywall sheet with a razor knife. Cut along the drawn lines. Break the drywall along the face cut, and fold the drywall slightly to make a crease in the paper backing of the drywall sheet. Cut through the crease in the backing paper with a razor knife from the backside of the drywall sheet, and remove the unwanted portion of drywall. To make cuts that are perpendicular to each other, use a keyhole saw for the shorter of the two cuts, and then fold and cut the drywall.
Most of us are very familiar with lockout/tagout procedures, test-before-touch practices, and applying safety grounds. While these are key safety aspects of putting equipment into an electrically safe condition, there are other safety items that need to be addressed when working in a natural disaster area. Items such as air quality, structural issues, and chemical spill exposure come into play. It is the responsibility of each company to keep its own people safe and supply them with special personal protective equipment (PPE), such as rubber boots, respirators, dust masks, portable gas monitors, and rubber gloves. As a service company, you must also coordinate with plant safety personnel you've contracted with to develop special safety procedures to address the ever-changing site conditions. Frequent safety meetings are a must to keep everyone up to date with the most current hazard conditions on the site.
If left untreated, water can be a destructive force to any residential or commercial property. It can lead to mold growth, stains, and can jeopardize the integrity of the building. Our restoration specialists can carefully inspect your property to determine the extent of the damage and can create customized solutions for you. With our 24/7 emergency services, you can rest assured you have a trusted team ready to help you.
Whatever the mess, whether you discovered flooding from a broken or leaky pipe, damage from frozen pipes, a sewer line break, a sink or toilet overflow, or a malfunctioning appliance like a water heater, washing machine, dishwasher or refrigerator in your home, or you’re a victim of storm damage, our Hillsboro flood damage technicians are equipped to handle any problem. WaterBear is here for all water cleanup and restore your home or business back to normal, quickly and right the first time. Acting fast against flood damage can increase the chance of salvaging usable materials, reducing costs, and saving time, so we guarantee a fast response and professional guidance to help you sort out the options, work with your insurance agent and get flood cleanup and restoration underway.
Porous materials include carpet, insulation, fabric, and similar items. If they’ve been soaked in water, you may have to cut them out and throw them away. Water will permanently damage most porous materials by shrinking or warping them, and mildew will damage them even further. And if you have a beloved piece of furniture you want to save, you could try isolating and drying it out, but the damage may already be done, especially if you see drywall water damage. Note that unsealed cement, drywall, and wood are also porous materials.

If you have a high concentration of mold, you may smell it. If you detect the typical musty odor, check for mold on damp carpets, damp walls, damp crawlspaces and wet wood under your floors, wet roof sheathing and other damp areas. Clean up these infestations right away before they get worse, and see the following photos for prevention measures on how to remove mold.
Unless you’re doing laundry, you probably don’t think twice about your washing machine. But if it breaks down, the results could be catastrophic. For example, if the supply hose is damaged or has a faulty connection to the wall or washing machine, more than 600 gallons of water could potentially spill out within an hour. That could lead to significant water damage, especially if your washing machine is located on the second floor of your home.
A critical part of any mold maintenance plan is to provide the technicians a historical summary of past issues and corrective actions so they may be aware of longstanding or unresolved issues during repairs. Unfortunately, some technicians skip this first stage until after they get a mold disassembled—and then they stop to research a problem whenever they see or feel something they don’t like.

Fire and Water Restoration companies are regulated by the appropriate state's Department of Consumer Affairs - usually the state contractors license board. In California, all Fire and Water Restoration companies must register with the California Contractors State License Board.[10] Presently, the California Contractors State License Board has no specific classification for "water and fire damage restoration."
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