Water is pumped out of your home or property to our recovery tank mounted inside our truck, ready for proper disposal. Standing water is removed, allowing our water extraction team inside your property to assess damage to all structures, furniture, and personal items, inspect your property to traces of mold, and to set up equipment designed to quickly dry the property.
Indoor and outdoor pipes and faucets. Routinely check indoor pipes under cabinets and sinks for leaks, rust, and any signs of deterioration. Minimize the potential for water damage from frozen and broken outdoor pipes by insulating supply lines (in attics, crawlspaces, and exterior walls), protecting exposed outdoor faucets, sealing gaps in exterior walls, and maintaining adequate heat in your home.
If you still do not understand why something isn't covered, and you think there is a chance for a review of your situation, don't be afraid to ask your agent or representative for a review or a second opinion. In a stressful situation like a claim, it is understandable that things may not be expressed clearly on either side. You want to make sure you understand fully.

For instance, if you remove 16 ejector pins from a mold and notice that a couple of them feel tight, will you remember which ones were tight later on, when you peruse past records to discover that galling pins have been a problem for the past five production runs? Knowing this information before you split or disassemble a mold removes some of the guesswork involved when looking for the root cause.
Inspect damaged materials for mold and mildew. Mold can start to grow in the right conditions in as little as 24 hours. For long-term issues, like mold caused by attic condensation, the mold may have started growing a long time ago. And if you find mold and mildew issues, you need to be very careful. Some mold is toxic to humans, and all mold is very damaging to the materials it infests. For small mold issues, cut out the material, bag it, and throw it away immediately. For serious mold issues, get out of the area, shut down any airflow (to avoid spore contamination) and call a professional. And keep in mind that mold can show up in hidden areas like inside walls or under floors, so this inspection and water damage repair will be ongoing.
Surface molds grow in just about any damp location, such as the grout lines of a ceramic tiled shower. They’re easy to scrub away with a mold cleaner mixture of 1/2 cup bleach, 1 qt. water and a little detergent. In mold remediation, the bleach in the cleaning mixture kills the mold, and the detergent helps lift it off the surface so you can rinse it away so it won’t return as fast. You can also buy a mildew cleaner at hardware stores, paint stores and most home centers.
Wanna keep things really cheap? Do it yourself! In some cases, minor mold problems (less than about 10 square feet of mold) in places like a bathroom corner can easily be handled by a handy homeowner with a free weekend afternoon and a few basic supplies from the hardware store. For more information, see our previous post on the subject: Do I need a Mold Remediation Professional?
Water damage is one of the most common causes of home insurance claims. According to ISO, Water damage claims are the second largest frequent insurance claim, following wind and hail damage. The percentage of claims due to water damage is also increasing, while other causes of damage have stayed fairly consistent or even decreased. It's no wonder people have a lot of questions about water damage and what is covered on home insurance, and why things, like "gradual damage" are not covered. Things get even more complicated when we look at the exceptions.
Homeowners insurance may help cover damage caused by leaking plumbing if the leak is sudden and accidental, such as if a washing machine supply hose suddenly breaks or a pipe bursts. However, homeowners insurance does not cover damage resulting from poor maintenance. So, if damage results after you fail to repair a leaky toilet, for example, homeowners insurance likely will not pay for repairs.
If the moisture damage has been neglected or gone unnoticed for long, you’re likely to find rot. Where possible, remove and replace soft, spongy studs and wall sheathing. Where removal is difficult, treat the affected areas with a wood preservative (available at home centers), after cleaning the wood and allowing it to dry. Then double up rotted members with pressure-treated wood.
Damage from long standing water falls in this class, like river flooding or storm surges from a hurricane. It has saturated materials such as stone, brick, and hardwood. These materials have low permeance — meaning they do not soak up liquids quickly. Time is the primary factor in this category. With a higher cost of cleanup and repair, it is important to get problems diagnosed and solved as quickly as possible.

While there are currently no government regulations in the United States dictating procedures, two certifying bodies, the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) and the RIA, do recommend standards of care. The current IICRC standard is ANSI/IICRC S500-2015.[9] It is the collaborative work of the IICRC, SCRT, IEI, IAQA, and NADCA.
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