Keep the basement dry as it's the most common place to find damage. Flooding, burst pipes, and even clogged gutters can cause leaks. Pitching the landscape, cleaning the gutters, and installing downspout extensions are simple outdoor fixes. From the inside, install a sump pump and water alarm. Have the basement inspected for waterproofing – or have some installed.
To further ensure a safe and effective environmental remediation, our crews are rigorously trained in mold removal procedures approved by the Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA); Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC);  the Restoration Industry Association (RIA); and our own in-house trainers. In addition, all of our superintendents, operations managers, project managers, project directors and regional managers  hold Certified Mold Remediation (CMR) certifications.
Unless you’re doing laundry, you probably don’t think twice about your washing machine. But if it breaks down, the results could be catastrophic. For example, if the supply hose is damaged or has a faulty connection to the wall or washing machine, more than 600 gallons of water could potentially spill out within an hour. That could lead to significant water damage, especially if your washing machine is located on the second floor of your home.
When a severe thunderstorm hits, the risk for property damage increases greatly as heavy rains can cause water damage as well as flooding in your home.  Flooding from storms is a major problem that requires a combination of methods to correctly treat it and protect your health.  Unlike typical water damage from a leaky roof or a burst pipe, flood damage often includes raw sewage that can complicate the remediation process.  As soon as flooding occurs in your home, make sure to call a flood damage cleanup expert to mitigate the damage and safely remove the flood water.

Flooring repairs typically range between $200 to $500. The type of flooring and the length of time water sits affects the costs of removal and repair. Some types of flooring are more permeable than others. For example, laminates and carpet soak up liquids and degrade the subfloor quickly, whereas hardwood can sit underwater for short periods with little damage. Most tile products are either impervious to liquids or can be cleaned and dried with little or no damage, though the area may need grout work.
This information is not intended as an offer to sell, or the solicitation of an offer to buy, a franchise. It is for information purposes only. Currently, the following states regulate the offer and sale of franchises: California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. If you are a resident of or want to locate a franchise in one of these states, we will not offer you a franchise unless and until we have complied with applicable pre-sale registration and disclosure requirements in your state.

How much drywall should you replace if you have drywall water damage? Generally speaking, if drywall has swelled or sagged 3/8 of an inch or more from the baseline, then you need to replace the entire sheet. Otherwise, you can cut out and water damage repair the water-stained portion. And remember to check the insulation behind the drywall for damage as well.


Water damage can originate by different sources such as a broken dishwasher hose, a washing machine overflow, a dishwasher leakage, broken/leaking pipes, flood waters and clogged toilets. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, 13.7% of all water used in the home today can be attributed to plumbing leaks.[3] On average that is approximately 10,000 gallons of water per year wasted by leaks for each US home. A tiny, 1/8-inch crack in a pipe can release up to 250 gallons of water a day.[4] According to Claims Magazine in August 2000, broken water pipes ranked second to hurricanes in terms of both the number of homes damaged and the amount of claims (on average $50,000 per insurance claim[citation needed]) costs in the US.[5] Experts suggest that homeowners inspect and replace worn pipe fittings and hose connections to all household appliances that use water at least once a year. This includes washing machines, dishwashers, kitchen sinks and bathroom lavatories, refrigerator icemakers, water softeners and humidifiers. A few US companies offer whole-house leak protection systems utilizing flow-based technologies. A number of insurance companies offer policy holders reduced rates for installing a whole-house leak protection system.
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