In addition to the obvious damage it does to upholstery and carpeting, floodwater is a corrosive and abrasive mixture of water and dirt that works its way into every seam and crevice of a vehicle. Sewage and chemical contaminants may also be present in floodwater, and in coastal areas salt water from ocean storm surges can increase the possibility of vehicle damage and costly auto repairs. Even if a car is mechanically safe to drive, sanitary concerns could make it unwise for you to do so.
Our highly trained technicians are ready to respond immediately to flood or water damage at your Columbus property. We have the experience, expertise, and training to restore your home or business quickly and properly. We use advanced inspection and extraction equipment to find the water and remove it as quickly as possible. Our technicians will monitor and document the drying process to ensure your property is back to normal.
Even if the water in your home is clear, it could be contaminated by sewage or household chemicals. Ramirez recommends wearing waders, hip- or waist-high waterproof boots. In addition, wear rubber gloves to remove water-damaged possessions and to avoid contaminants, Ramirez notes. Be sure to throw out any food that may have come into contact with flood waters. FEMA recommends boiling water until authorities declare the water supply is safe.
While there are currently no government regulations in the United States dictating procedures, two certifying bodies, the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) and the RIA, do recommend standards of care. The current IICRC standard is ANSI/IICRC S500-2015.[9] It is the collaborative work of the IICRC, SCRT, IEI, IAQA, and NADCA.
All water damage restoration jobs are unique and the amount of work required for each depends on a variety of factors such as the amount of area in the home that’s been damaged and how long the water has been present. Once a professional water damage cleanup vendor arrives and has a chance to inspect the home, they’ll be able to put together a detailed project timeline specific to your job. In the meantime, we’ve listed the eight common phases that occur during the water damage restoration process and what happens in each, so you’ll know what to expect.
Pipes that burst or leak are common culprits of water damage. Drains and toilets that get backed up and blocked can cause undue pressure in the pipe, which then causes it to burst or leak. Garbage disposals that aren’t working properly are another common reason for pipes to burst, as are roots that grow in the yard into the sewer lines. Old or rusty pipes are also more prone to leaking.
Cut through the paper facing of the drywall sheet with a razor knife. Cut along the drawn lines. Break the drywall along the face cut, and fold the drywall slightly to make a crease in the paper backing of the drywall sheet. Cut through the crease in the backing paper with a razor knife from the backside of the drywall sheet, and remove the unwanted portion of drywall. To make cuts that are perpendicular to each other, use a keyhole saw for the shorter of the two cuts, and then fold and cut the drywall.
Most insurance policies will pay to remove mold only if it must be removed to repair or replace property that was damaged by a covered peril. You must report water damage that was hidden from view within 30 days of the date you first noticed it. Some companies provide a limited amount of mold remediation coverage, and other companies will allow you to buy additional coverage for mold remediation by endorsement.
Wanna keep things really cheap? Do it yourself! In some cases, minor mold problems (less than about 10 square feet of mold) in places like a bathroom corner can easily be handled by a handy homeowner with a free weekend afternoon and a few basic supplies from the hardware store. For more information, see our previous post on the subject: Do I need a Mold Remediation Professional?
While there are currently no government regulations in the United States dictating procedures, two certifying bodies, the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) and the RIA, do recommend standards of care. The current IICRC standard is ANSI/IICRC S500-2015.[9] It is the collaborative work of the IICRC, SCRT, IEI, IAQA, and NADCA.
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