Once any standing water has been removed, it’s time to start drying out the home. Your contractor will bring in different types of air movers (think of these like glorified fans) to help circulate airflow throughout the room. Don’t be surprised if they need to lift up a section of the carpet or position one of the air movers at certain sections of the walls to ensure air is getting to the most saturated parts of the room. If you have hardwood floors, they may use floor mats which help draw the water out of the floor. If needed, they might even remove the baseboards and drill holes into the drywall to help the walls dry faster. While some of these methods may sound extreme, they’re making every effort to dry the home without having to demolish and rebuild, which could add multiple weeks to the project timeline and become very costly.
If it snows where you live, be wary about the formation of ice dams on your roof. This happens when the heat inside your home causes water to melt in the middle of your roof. The water then refreezes near the edges, forming a dam that prevents melting snow from draining off the roof. The water that backs up can leak into your home and damage ceilings, walls and other areas of your home. To prevent ice dams from forming, insulate your attic to keep heat from rising and reaching the roof.

Regular cleaning may maintain household furniture’s upkeep but with Dallas Water Damage’s advanced cleaning technology, our technicians can fully restore your furniture in their brand new state while keeping them free from bacteria and viruses that may cause common health problems. Our competitive pricing options vary depending on your water damage and professional cleaning needs. You may call our 24 hour emergency call-in service for a free estimate today.

Most of us are very familiar with lockout/tagout procedures, test-before-touch practices, and applying safety grounds. While these are key safety aspects of putting equipment into an electrically safe condition, there are other safety items that need to be addressed when working in a natural disaster area. Items such as air quality, structural issues, and chemical spill exposure come into play. It is the responsibility of each company to keep its own people safe and supply them with special personal protective equipment (PPE), such as rubber boots, respirators, dust masks, portable gas monitors, and rubber gloves. As a service company, you must also coordinate with plant safety personnel you've contracted with to develop special safety procedures to address the ever-changing site conditions. Frequent safety meetings are a must to keep everyone up to date with the most current hazard conditions on the site.
Category 2 Water - Refers to a source of water that contains a significant degree of chemical, biological or physical contaminants and causes discomfort or sickness when consumed or even exposed to. Known as "grey water". This type carries microorganisms and nutrients of micro-organisms. Examples are toilet bowls with urine (no feces), sump pump failures, seepage due to hydrostatic failure and water discharge from dishwashers or washing machines.
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